The Big C – The Battle Doesn’t End After Treatment

by Jennifer L Thorpe

I beg you all to read this article attached. PLEASE! If not now, then save it for later. If you know anyone who has had cancer and was blessed enough to survive, this is a must read. In fact, you know me so that is reason enough to take a few minutes out of your day and read this.

If you don’t know anyone, then still READ. Chances are you will know someone one day. However, I don’t wish that on my worst of enemies.

Although this woman was diagnosed with a different form of cancer and her treatments where far longer and more intense than mine, what she says is all too familiar for me and most other people who have walked the cancer battle path. I have a hard time explaining to those around me and this woman has put it in a nutshell.

I was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in November 2011. I was triple negative which means I do not qualify for the 5 year pill they give to prevent it from coming back. I had a lumpectomy on the left side and lymph node dissection, followed with 12 rounds of chemotherapy over the course of 6 months, then 6 straight weeks of radiation therapy. Let me tell you, it was not even close to what I thought. It was hell.

Here I am almost 3 years out of treatment and I thought I would feel amazing. I was wrong. If you read this article, you might understand why I say I do not feel amazing. After you read it, please share the article.

One of the quotes from this article that stood out very strong for me-

“I have learned since the day of my diagnosis that cancer affects all of who we are,” Ms. Jardin told me. “There was no aspect of my life that wasn’t torn apart as my body was literally torn apart. In my case, after my treatment ended, I experienced mental health issues that were more intense and more debilitating than I’d ever experienced before in my life.

“This thing that we experience that is casually referred to as post-treatment depression is much more than just that. It has many facets: spiritual, psychological, social, medical and financial, among many other things.”

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/03/16/lost-in-transition-after-cancer/?module=BlogPost-Title&version=Blog+Main&contentCollection=Life%2C+Interrupted&action=Click&pgtype=Blogs&region=Body&_r=0

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